Geoff Flynn.com


Solid Showing For Emmys on Move to Monday
August 25, 2014

They said it's the first time the Emmy Awards have been on Monday night since 1976. It was also pushed back a month so it wouldn't conflict with football. As host Seth Meyers said to open his monologue, “This year, we're doing the Emmys on a Monday night in August, which, if I understand television, means the Emmys are about to get canceled.” Fortunately the show wasn't all that bad.

The show was pushed back a month because of football, but was bumped from Sunday to Monday because they didn't want to be on the same night as the MTV Video Music Awards. In recognizing that fact, Meyers came up with his best line of the night—“MTV has an awards show for music videos even though they no longer show music videos. That's like network television holding an awards show and giving all the trophies to cable and Netflix.”

Meyers does a nice job as host. I don't understand the presenter pairings anymore, but I also don't know many of the shows these days either. It's nice to know some things are still the same—Modern Family won Best Comedy Series for the fifth straight year, Big Bang Theory's Jim Parsons was Best Actor in a Comedy, Bryan Cranston won Best Actor in a Drama, and his show Breaking Bad took home Best Drama Series.

Had I been an avid TV watcher over the past year or so, I would have loved the bit with Weird Al Yankovic even more than I already did. Harking back to the days when TV show themes explained the plot (Brady Bunch, Gilligan's Island, Beverly Hillbillies, etc.), Weird Al put words to today's TV themes. I don't watch Game of Thrones, but I get that characters on that show don't last very long. You get the idea.

It seems strange, but I can't remember any awards show where you couldn't wait for them to get to the 'in memoriam' segment. We all wanted to see the tribute to Robin Williams, and what would be said and done. After an acceptance speech and an awkward transition, the segment began with Sara Bareilles singing 'Smile', while they rolled through the names. You expected names like Peter O'Toole, Ann B. Davis, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Harold Ramis, maybe forgot that Marcia Wallace and David Brenner had died, and perhaps didn't even know that James Avery (Uncle Phil from The Fresh Prince of Bel Air) was no longer with us. The scroll ended with a picture of Williams, and Billy Crystal on stage. Crystal, who was probably closer to Williams than anyone else in show business, told a couple of stories about Robin, including Williams improvising as a Russian baseball player (“In Russia we only have one team—the Reds.”). Crystal's best line: “It's very hard to talk about him in the past because he was so present in all of our lives.”


Moments: Best reaction: Kathy Bates when announced that she won for Best Supporting Actress in a miniseries. Total shock... Weirdest speech: Sarah Silverman. I don't know what she was talking about... Best line from presenter: Jimmy Kimmel yelling at Matthew McConaughey for being nominated for True Detective saying "you just won the Oscar like five months ago. No offense, but how many of those speeches of yours are we supposed to sit through? Alright alright alright already."... Most awkward transition: I guess there's no easy way to do it, but segueing to the deaths of the year from an award is just weird. We also weren't told who was singing until two commercial breaks later... Fun: Cranston 'reminding' Julia Louis-Dreyfus that he played a dentist and Elaine's boyfriend on Seinfeld when they were presenting, then grabbed her and kissed her when she won for Best Actress in a comedy... Best speech: Cranston. Some can give the most heartfelt thank yous but not be very eloquent, and then there's Cranston who made you believe this was the most important thing to ever happen in his life. And to think he was on Malcolm in the Middle for crying out loud.

Random observations: Doesn't Aaron Paul from Breaking Bad look like an evil Chandler Bing (Matthew Perry) from Friends? Even sounds like him, too... Why is it that every time someone wins an award, they never know which way to walk offstage when they are done with their speech?





View All Commentaries